Tag Archives: #nationalparks

Magic and mystery at Mount Field

Mt Field © Louise Creely

Just an hour’s drive from Hobart, following the beautiful Derwent River, is one of my favourite places in Australia. Mount Field National Park. It’s the perfect place for a walk – from a leisurely stroll to stunning Russell Falls, to an epic trek around the Tarn Shelf.

© Louise Creely

Russell Falls

On this icy day, we take the middle ground – a short, but fascinating walk on the Lady Barron Falls circuit, past Russell Falls and through the tall trees walk. It takes about 2.5 hours and there’s a few stairs in there to get your heart rate up – and it’s worth every step.

Fungi fairyland

Fungi © Louise Creely

… a fungi fairyland

It’s amazing what you notice when you really look. All that’s missing here is a couple of fairies flitting around. Wait, what was that?

Oh. It’s EB. He’s found a set of stairs to drag me up, so he’s a bit excited. Only 248 of them (yes, I counted). So much for strolls through fungi fairyland.

IMG_8842

Land of the giants

Prepare to be incredulated (is that a word?). The Tasmanian swamp gum is the tallest flowering plant in the world. The tallest recorded in Tassie was 98 metres, so the Mount Field ones are shorties really. 70+ metres short…

Tasmanian swamp gum

Tasmanian swamp gum (Eucalyptus regnans).

As they grow, the lower branches break off, leaving a sleek trunk reaching ever-skyward.  They’re so fascinating I got a sore neck just staring up at them.

© Louise Creely

Did someone say short?

Forest of the fallen

There’s a strange beauty even in the fallen giants. From the earth they rise, and to the earth they return…

There’s nothing quite like nature to lift you up and bring you down to earth.

roots of a fallen tree © Louise Creely

Nature’s artwork…

After all that walking, slipping into the Derwent Estate and Stefano Lubiana wineries on the way home is the end to a perfect day. Cheers.

 


Surprise platypus encounter

© Louise Creely. All rights reserved.There are times when you really need to knuckle down and get all those urgent things done. But hey, it’s perfect early-Spring weather and a road trip just feels… well, urgent. 

After exploring Toowoomba’s street art (more on that later) and free-camping at Gil Weir near Miles, we’ve arrived at Carnarvon Gorge in outback Queensland.

And if we ever needed convincing we have to explore more of our beautiful country, today was it.

After setting up camp at Takarakka Bush Resort, we went for a wander along the creek that wraps around the camping area.

Darter © Louise Creely

© Louise Creely

The Takarakka logo is a platypus, so I’m pretty excited. I’ve never seen a platypus in the wild.

Whiptail wallaby © Louise Creely

Whiptail wallaby © Louise Creely

We soon come across the ‘platypus conservation area’ signs with viewing benches set up so you can watch for platypus without disturbing them.

But let’s be honest, EB would never make a wildlife photographer. It would require being still for more than two minutes.

So after a brief scan of the water for ripples, I catch up to him striding up the creek!

Further along, we meet a lady who clearly has the gift of stillness (and a comfortable camping chair).

She breathlessly tells us a platypus has just swum right past her, so we wait and watch… and wait.

Finally, undeterred by EB hopping from one foot to the other (doing his best impression of a predator), the platypus surfaces … but promptly disappears again.

Platypus at Carnarvon Gorge © Louise Creely

A brief glimpse… © Louise Creely

We’ve almost given up hope of another glimpse, when there is a rustling in the reeds on the opposite bank. The platypus is actually leaping up the bank to pull down reeds and twigs.

Platypus gathering reeds © Louise Creely

Platypus gathering bedding material for her burrow © Louise Creely

When she’s collected some bedding material for her nest, she tucks it under her paddle-like tail and drags it back to her camouflaged burrow in the creek bank. What an amazing way to start our stay at Carnarvon Gorge. And tomorrow we walk.

Platypus gathering nesting material © Louise Creely

Platypus taking dry reeds and twigs back to her nest © Louise Creely


Fast platypus facts

The duck-billed platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) is an egg laying mammal called a monotreme.

Found only in freshwater streams in eastern Australia and all of Tasmania, the platypus has sleek fur like an otter, a bill and webbed feet like a duck, and a tail like a beaver.

But while they look cute and cuddly, the male platypus has a secret weapon – a venomous spur on each of his back feet. The venom won’t kill you but the pain is (apparently) excruciating. A good enough reason to keep your distance!

Meanwhile, soon after mating, the female platypus begins to gather dried reeds and sticks for her burrow in the creek bank…

Platypus nesting © Louise Creely

© Louise Creely